Vox Sentences: DACA on the docket

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DACA hangs in the balance with SCOTUS case

  • Supreme Court justices seemed to be leaning toward allowing President Trump to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program at oral arguments Tuesday. [NBC News / Pete Williams]
  • While oral arguments don’t always give the complete picture, the five conservative justices on the court seemed likely to back the Trump administration’s attempt to end the protections President Obama afforded to around 700,000 young immigrants. [Bloomberg / Greg Stohr]
  • Solicitor General Noel Francisco, representing the Department of Homeland Security, told the court that the department took issue with the broad category of people protected from deportation. [Washington Post / Robert Barnes]
  • Just hours before the Supreme Court hearing, Trump tweeted a disparaging statement about DACA recipients. [Vox / Aaron Rupar]
  • It’s the third major immigration fight to reach the Supreme Court under Trump. [USA Today / Richard Wolf]
  • ”DACA has changed my life and protected my family: It has allowed me to go back to school, start my career, and feel safe,” wrote Martín Batalla Vidal, who sued the Trump administration over its push to end the program. [Vox / Martín Batalla Vidal]

Morales is off to Mexico

  • Bolivian President Evo Morales fled to Mexico for political asylum following his resignation only a day earlier in the face of accusations of vote tampering and protests. [Remezcla / Raquel Reichard]
  • Morales departed Bolivia in a Mexican government plane while the military forces took to the streets to put down unrest in La Paz. [Reuters / Gram Slattery, Monica Machicao and Daniel Ramos]
  • When he arrived in Mexico City, Morales promised that “the struggle continues” and made references to returning to Bolivia at some point. [Al Jazeera]
  • Yascha Mounk argues that the allegations of Morales’s vote tampering pushed citizens to act, after the president had tried for a fourth term in office. [The Atlantic / Yascha Mounk]
  • The New York Times editorial board writes that while Morales is gone, the problems that brought Bolivians into the streets aren’t. [New York Times]

Miscellaneous

  • Alex Trebek had an emotional moment when a contestant used Final Jeopardy to express the widely felt fondness for the retiring host. [Slate / Matthew Dessem]
  • Supreme Court will allow case brought against a gun manufacturer by Sandy Hook mass shooting survivor and advocates to continue. [Politico]
  • Orders from their commander to download an information app may have made soldiers a risk to their intelligence unit. [Washington Post / Alex Horton]
  • One writer who decided to ditch his smartphone feels it has helped him become more present and mindful. [Digital Trends / Shubham Agarwal]
  • Climate change lawsuit numbers are only rising. [Vox / Umair Irfan]

Verbatim

“According to the law, even if you do it once, you’re committing a crime. So riders’ immediate reaction to the authorities calling them criminals is to feel that the system is incompetent.” [Professor Graham Currie of Australia’s Monash University explains why fare evasion is such a big problem and sensitive subject]


Watch this: China’s fight with the NBA, explained

All it took was one tweet to set a very expensive fight in motion. [YouTube / Mac Schneider]


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