Trump lawyers refuse to participate in the House Judiciary Committee’s first impeachment hearing

The White House has announced that neither President Donald Trump nor his lawyers will participate in the House Judiciary Committee’s first hearing in the impeachment inquiry Wednesday.

Though Trump has recently signaled openness to providing written testimony in the impeachment hearings, he has also repeatedly worked to delegitimize them, meaning his decision not to accept committee Chair Jerry Nadler’s invitation isn’t particularly surprising.

Republican allies of Trump have leveled process complaints against the inquiry since it began, and in rejecting the Judiciary Committee’s invitation Sunday evening, White House counsel Pat Cipollone continued that line of attack, calling the upcoming …

Giving Tuesday, explained

Giving Tuesday is upon us — and not a moment too soon as we emerge from the post-Thanksgiving shopping frenzy.

Black Friday, the day after Thanksgiving, has always been the kickoff event of the holiday shopping season, and one of the biggest shopping days of the year. Marketing experts recognized how popular it was and followed it up with Cyber Monday, a second day of mega-sales focused on online shopping. It took off, making the period after Thanksgiving famous for its blitz of deals.

In 2012, the 92nd Street Y in New York and the United Nations Foundation introduced …

Instagram is broken. It also broke us.

I downloaded Instagram in 2012, in the spring before what would be the worst summer of my life and the best autumn I’ve ever had. I remember them both vividly, sulking home in July heat to an air mattress in a sweltering bedroom I shared to save money, convinced my boyfriend was about to dump me.

He did, but it was fine; we got back together a week later, and by September I was studying abroad, city-hopping around Europe with people who would become some of my closest friends.

On my Instagram feed, though, the summer and fall of 2012 …

All the clues in Watchmen about Doctor Manhattan

This article contains spoilers for Watchmen’s seventh episode.

Sometimes HBO reminds us, in the best way possible, that its take on Watchmen is a comic book show after all. Episode seven is a prime example of how a well-executed plot twist can change everything that we thought we knew and make us re-watch and re-think everything all over again.

After a week to breathe and ruminate on the repercussions of episode six’s big reveal — that Angela’s grandpa Will Reeves was the pioneer hero known as Hooded Justice — the show hit a lever and plunged us down another narrative …

Joe Sestak, former congressman and admiral, ends his bid for president

Joe Sestak, a former admiral and Pennsylvania congressman, has dropped out of the Democratic presidential primary.

He exited thanking his supporters in a statement, writing, “I could never pay enough for what I experienced, and the men and women I met. … I will miss the opportunities I had in experiencing America in such a wonderful way!”

Sestak was one of the last candidates to join the crowded 2020 field, saying he stayed out of the race for the first half of 2019 to care for his ill daughter. He worked to make up for lost time by camping …

Private prisons face an uncertain future as states turn their backs on the industry

Alex Friedmann, 50, was transferred to a Tennessee public prison in 1998 after having spent the previous six years incarcerated in a private facility. Everything was different: there were more blankets, the toilet paper wasn’t as cheap, and correctional officers were everywhere.

“First thing I noticed was there’s a heck of a lot more staff or boots on the ground in the public prisons,” he told Vox. “There was not such an emphasis on cutting costs.”

After being released in 1999, Friedmann — now the associate director of the Human Rights Defense Center — began fighting for the abolishment of …

The faulty technology behind ankle monitors

Electronic GPS monitoring within the criminal justice system isn’t widespread. But it’s become more prevalent in recent years.

In 2005, around 53,000 people were supervised with monitors, according to the PEW Charitable Trusts. By 2015, that number had reached more than 125,000 people. That’s a 136 percent increase in just 10 years.

Some people see the rise in electronic monitors as a positive alternative to mass incarceration because it lets people pay their debt to society while still providing for their families, host Arielle Duhaime-Ross explains.

But as this episode of the Reset podcast uncovers, the technology of ankle …