Facebook is taking down some, but not all, quarantine protest event pages

Facebook is taking down some event pages promoting controversial anti-stay-at-home protests that are taking place across the US — but it’s only doing this in areas where the events violate local Covid-19 social distancing rules. Facebook’s selective response mirrors a larger fracture across the country as the Trump administration has given conflicting guidance about how and when restrictions should be lifted and has largely left these decisions up to individual state politicians.

The move comes after Facebook faced criticism for allowing people to coordinate anti-quarantine protests on its platform. Public health officials, state officials, and health care workers say …

Coronavirus stimulus money will be wasted on fossil fuels

As countries across the world go into lockdown in response to Covid-19, economies are in free fall. Almost every sector is taking a hit, hemorrhaging jobs and value. And almost every sector will be shaped, for years to come, by the speed, amount, and nature of public assistance it receives. There is a finite amount of time, resources, and political will available to get economies going again; not every sector will get what it wants or needs.

In short, the decisions legislators make in response to the coronavirus crisis will have an enormous influence on what kind of economies …

Watch our new show Answered on Quibi 

We’re excited to announce that today we’re launching a new show, Answered, focused entirely on the coronavirus. The show is designed to help answer common questions and provide clarity and insight in this confusing moment in time.

Each five- to six-minute episode is hosted by Vox’s Cleo Abram. You’ll recognize her from the great work she’s done with Vox’s short-form video team, and from our YouTube original series: Glad You Asked. In every episode of Answered she’ll talk to prominent experts, journalists, and professionals to help break down a specific topic and deliver a satisfying …

How Muslims are preparing to observe Ramadan during the coronavirus pandemic

Last Ramadan, Asad Dandia broke his fast surrounded by friends, old and new, at the Islamic Center at New York University, a major community center that he’s been a part of for many years. As they broke their fast at sunset, Muslims from varying communities bonded over their shared meals.

“I use ‘communities’ in the plural because Muslims of New York come from all national, ethnic, social, and denominational backgrounds, and I consider myself blessed to be part of so many,” Dandia, a Brooklyn-born graduate student, told me.

But with most countries still in varying degrees of lockdown …