The pandemic will put billionaires’ commitment to journalism to the test

Outrage may be flowing toward Laurene Powell Jobs, the majority owner of the Atlantic, after news came on Thursday that the magazine laid off almost 20 percent of its staff. But she will not be the last billionaire owner of a major news outlet who will have to make hard decisions in the next few weeks.

Over the last decade, billionaires like Powell Jobs have picked up prestige media outlets and won respect from those who saw these deals as a form of civic leadership and public service. Not every publication could get bought by a billionaire, to be sure, …

A painter tracked down the thief who stole her work. She discovered a muse.

Much thievery is committed with the aim of enriching somebody’s personal coffers, usually the thief’s. And that’s true of some art theft as well; paintings or sculptures are stolen so they can be sold on the black market, or used as a bargaining chip.

But sometimes art disappears for reasons that are difficult to understand. On April 20, 2015, thieves made off with two paintings by the young Czech painter Barbora Kysilkova, who was exhibiting at Galleri Nobel in Oslo, Norway. Kysilkova is a talented painter, mostly of people in emotionally charged moments, but she wasn’t particularly well-known at …

9 podcasts that can help soothe your coronavirus anxiety

These days, I prefer listening to looking. Staying at home means a lot of my work and social life happens on Zoom, and staring at a computer screen for so many hours each day feels draining. So when I want to give my eyes a rest and my emotions a boost, I go hunting for podcasts.

And in the era of Covid-19, there are a lot of great new podcasts to be had.

I’m not talking about the newsy or informational ones, which dig into the science and policy questions surrounding the pandemic. Those are useful, too, but we’re …

More meetings, longer hours, living anywhere: How the coronavirus changed office work

When the world eventually opens back up after the Covid-19 crisis, many parts of society, the economy, and the workplace will not be what we remember. For so-called knowledge workers, people whose jobs typically require analytical thinking as well as computers, not only will their offices look different, but the way in which they work will be altered, too. It might never be the same.

The giant forced experiment of remote working en masse brought about by the pandemic will likely last longer than many thought. Tech companies seem to be taking the concept especially seriously. Facebook recently …