Category: Daily news

Category: Daily news

7 key House primaries to watch on Super Tuesday

While the Democratic presidential race might be front of mind this Tuesday, March 3, there are also plenty of primaries for congressional seats happening on Super Tuesday — ones that could have an impact in November as Republicans attempt to wrest the House speaker’s gavel back from Nancy Pelosi.

Voters in 14 states and one territory will head to the polls (or caucuses, if you live in American Samoa) on Tuesday. And though not all of them will hold primaries for down-ballot races, some — like California and Texas — are home to a handful of especially contentious races for …

Who is winning the Super Tuesday delegate count so far

As votes are still being counted, here’s the total delegate count for Super Tuesday so far, powered by results from our partners at Decision Desk and the Virginia Center for Politics.

As of 11:30 pm Eastern Tuesday, the following numbers of Super Tuesday delegates have been awarded:

  • Former Vice President Joe Biden: 169 delegates
  • Sen. Bernie Sanders: 98 delegates
  • Former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg: 19 delegates
  • Sen. Elizabeth Warren: 5 delegates

These results will be updated throughout the night.

The magic number to win the Democratic Party’s nomination for president is 1,991 delegates. It could take months to …

Super Tuesday: Live results

Super Tuesday is the biggest voting day in the Democratic nomination process, and the results in its 15 contests — which you can follow below — will be enormously consequential in shaping the field going forward.

With the results in the four early states in the books, the Democratic contest is now primarily about one thing: the delegate count. And that count will be dramatically transformed by Super Tuesday. Just 155 delegates (4 percent of the total) were allocated in the early states, but 1,344 delegates (34 percent of the total) are now up for grabs in this day’s …

Tech billionaire Marc Benioff used to give millions to politicians. Then he bought Time magazine.

Marc Benioff, the billionaire who has emerged as a spokesperson for a more liberal and civically active Silicon Valley, is stepping away from partisan politics.

Recode has learned the founder of Salesforce is no longer making political contributions to candidates, fundraising for candidates, or endorsing candidates. It’s a stark departure from Benioff’s storied past as a political animal who has given millions to campaigns and picked bruising fights with other tech leaders over tax evasion and corporate power. The reason? Benioff is likely striving for impartiality after buying Time magazine in late 2018.

“I will not [be taking] public …

What Elizabeth Warren staying in the race means for Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden

Sen. Elizabeth Warren seems like she’s going to persist her way to the convention — and that could have some important implications for how the 2020 Democratic primary plays out.

Moderates appear to be rallying around former Vice President Joe Biden. Sen. Amy Klobuchar and former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg dropped out and endorsed him in an attempt to consolidate the anti-Sen. Bernie Sanders coalition. That’s potentially a problem for the left.

“Moderates consolidating their support around Biden and progressives remaining still a little bit more divided between Warren and Sanders is not an ideal situation,” said Julian …

10 cities captured nearly 50% of the growth in new tech jobs

US jobs in tech, arguably the dominant industry of our time, are increasingly concentrating in a handful of already prominent tech cities, according to the Brookings Institution’s new analysis of census data. This means that tech companies are sourcing employment from a more stratified portion of the country while vast swaths of America are missing out on the economic growth tied to the industry.

In an essay and a brief for the American Enterprise Institute, Brookings looked specifically at the distribution of digital service jobs in the US, such as those in software publishing; data processing and hosting; computer systems …

Twitter told its 5,000 employees to work from home because of the coronavirus

Twitter is encouraging its more than 4,800 employees around the world to work from home in response to the spread of the coronavirus. It’s one of the most drastic steps taken by any tech company so far in response to the outbreak.

Over the last few days, a number of Silicon Valley companies have been coping with the virus’s incursion into their workforces. Two Amazon employees based in Italy have contracted the coronavirus, and Facebook has reportedly advised its employees to “feel free” to work from home.

But Twitter went a step further on Tuesday.

“Beginning …

Super Tuesday, explained

The first day of the Democratic contest that really matters for the cold, hard delegate math — Super Tuesday — is almost here.

Tuesday, March 3, will be enormously important because it’s the first day that a lot of the delegates necessary to win the nomination are at stake, and the biggest delegate day overall. A total of 14 states and one territory — including California and Texas, the two most populous states in the country — will hold their primaries or caucuses.

Candidates are competing for about a third of the overall delegates at stake. Those 1,344 delegates allocated …

“It’s all about speed”: The most important lessons from China’s Covid-19 response

There’s one country in the world that currently has the most knowledge of and experience with Covid-19: China.

China, and specifically Hubei province, is where Covid-19 disease emerged; it’s where scientists first sequenced the virus’s genome; it’s where 83 percent of the 89,000 cases known to date have been recorded; and it’s where doctors and health authorities have been battling an epidemic for two months — while other countries braced themselves for outbreaks — using unprecedented public health measures, including a cordon sanitaire that affected millions.

In recent weeks, though, the number of new infections and deaths reported …

The fate of Obamacare is in the Supreme Court’s hands yet again

The Supreme Court announced on Monday that it will hear California v. Texas and United States House of Representatives v. Texas, two consolidated cases that represent an existential threat to Obamacare, and that were brought by a coalition of red states. That means that, for the third time since President Barack Obama signed the Affordable Care Act in 2010, the justices will hear a lawsuit seeking to eviscerate this legislation.

Texas turns on Congress’s decision to repeal Obamacare’s individual mandate. As originally enacted, the Affordable Care Act requires most Americans to either obtain health insurance or pay higher taxes. …