How Working From Home Changed Wardrobes Around the World

Have months of self-isolation, lockdown and working from home irrevocably changed what we will put on once we go out again? For a long time, the assumption was yes. Now, as restrictions ease and the opening up of offices and travel is dangled like a promise, that expectation is more like a qualified “maybe.” But not every country’s experience of the last year was the same, nor were the clothes that dominated local wardrobes. Before we can predict what’s next, we need to understand what was. Here, eight New York Times correspondents in seven different countries share dispatches from a

How Are You Dividing Housework During the Pandemic?

Housework has always been difficult to divide. Now, perhaps, even more so. Over the last year, people around the world have done a ton of housework while sheltering in place. From nonstop dishwashing and toy gathering to caring for children in remote learning, it seems as if we are constantly cleaning up after ourselves, our roommates and our loved ones.

So the Modern Love Podcast team wants to know: What systems have you developed with your partner, roommates or family members to divvy up housework fairly? Do you flip a coin? Reverse traditional gender roles? Leave passive-aggressive notes? Or have

Could the Pandemic Prompt an ‘Epidemic of Loss’ of Women in the Sciences?

Like many women during the pandemic, Alisa Stephens found working from home to be a series of wearying challenges.

Dr. Stephens is a biostatistician at the University of Pennsylvania, and the technical and detail-oriented nature of her work requires long uninterrupted stretches of thought. Finding the time and mental space for that work with two young children at home proved to be an impossibility.

“That first month was really hard,” she recalled of the lockdown. Her infant daughter’s day care was closed, and her 5-year-old was at home instead of at school. With their nanny unable to come to the

The Not-Quite-Everything Store

In exchange for discounts, customers can expect longer shipping windows, less consistent quality control and a not-insignificant chance that a product was never what it seemed — which, to be fair, isn’t always clear in the first place. (Product listings are often vague and poorly translated.)

Wish’s interface instills in customers a sense that they probably deserve whatever shows up in the mail a week (or four weeks) later. Maybe that’s a nice surprise, like an $8 smartwatch that, against all odds, syncs with your phone’s text messages. Or an essential oil diffuser that doesn’t look much like the photo …

Weddings: Focus on the Marriage, Not the Wedding

Carmen Myer and Aaron James have made it through plenty of storms together, and many more over the years as children, including Hurricanes Katrina, Rita and Gustav.

The most recent, and perhaps most nerve-racking, occurred just three weeks before their wedding. A fierce February storm brought freezing temperatures throughout Texas, taxing the state’s electrical infrastructure and leaving the couple without water or power in their Houston home for days.

“A pipe burst, covering 60 percent of our home with water and leaving a giant hole in our ceiling,” said Ms. Myer, 32.

Fortunately, just two days before the storm hit,

Making a Living at Financial Domination Online

“As a sub, I have this need, this fetish, to hand over everything,” said R.J., who is gay and single, and estimated that he has spent more than $150,000 on dozens of cash masters since he started. “It’s this feeling of giving up complete control, of someone having ownership over you. I find that really arousing.”

The feeling is echoed by other financial submissives. “This idea of giving their money away, and not knowing what’s going to happen — it’s the ultimate surrender of power, and it’s very liberating for them,” said Dr. Hammack, the psychology professor.

Dr. Hammack said …

Clementon Park and Splash World Auction Has Surprise Ending

Mr. Futrell estimates there were more than 1,000 trolley parks in the United States in the decade before the first world war, many of them in small suburban towns. In those boom years, Clementon Park added one of the region’s first nickelodeon movie theaters and a new bathhouse. Vacation homes and restaurants sprung up throughout town.

The war was tough on the amusement industry, but as trolley parks closed elsewhere, this one grew. In 1919, the Gibbs family installed a Ferris wheel and a steam-driven carousel. That same year, they spent $80,000 — more than $1 million today — for …

Looking to Travel for a Sense of Renewal

Svetlana Reznikova-Steinway, an emergency-room physician who lives in Phoenix, has spent the better part of a year pulling double-duty in an overwhelmed intensive care unit. Early in the pandemic, she and her husband, a urologist, developed a system for after work, stripping off their scrubs in their garage to protect their 12-year-old daughter and 10-year-old twin sons from the virus. She has gotten used to intubating critically ill Covid-19 patients. She has learned how to delicately use patients’ phones to FaceTime family members so that everyone can say their goodbyes.

“It’s been horrific,” Dr. Reznikova-Steinway, 43, said. “My colleagues and

The 49 Best New Menswear Items Under $100 to Buy Right Now

Love our weekly Best New Menswear column, but can’t always afford the rare grails featured therein? (It’s cool—us neither.) Well, this is the semi-regular roundup for you. We’ve gathered the coolest, flyest, game-raising-est sneakers, jackets, jewelry, and more available right now—all with a hard ceiling of $100. If you’ve got a spare Benjamin or two burning a hole in your pocket, here are 49 ways to spend it wisely.

All products featured on GQ are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

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In Japan, a Watch Collection May Include an Alias

TOKYO — A De Bethune DB27 Titan Hawk V2 wristwatch alongside a plate of fried gyoza. A Kari Voutilainen 28SC flanked by a serving of tonkatsu with accompanying soup, dipping sauce and pickles. And a Richard Mille RM016 accented with oysters in yuzu.

From his daily Instagram posts, you actually learn more about Chrono Peace’s collection of more than 600 watches — and his food preferences — than you do about the collector himself. You never see his face, and his real name is never disclosed.

His 14,600 Instagram followers don’t know it, nor do readers of his regular contributions