Mom, Can’t We Speak English Here?

When we visit my mother, she speaks to me in Hungarian, her native language, in front of my husband who doesn’t understand a word of it. He told me he feels excluded by this because he can’t participate in our conversations. I’ve told my mother her behavior is rude, but she persists, saying, “I am Hungarian, and this is my house.” She is fluent in English, so she could honor our request if she wanted to. Also, she and I speak on the phone frequently. If she had something private to say to me, she could do it then. Otherwise,

The Meaning of Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s Lace Collar

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Credit…Doug Mills/The New York Times

[Live coverage of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg funeral, which begins on Wednesday with three days of honors.]

In 2014, the Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the pioneering legal mind and advocate for equal treatment of the sexes who died on Friday, did something that probably none of her male colleagues were ever asked to do: she gave a tour of her office closet.

The occasion was an interview with Katie Couric after Justice Ginsburg’s strongly-worded, 35-page dissent in the

Fall’s Here. Can We Still Go Apple Picking?

Across much of the country, fall is the season of apple-picking, corn mazes, winery harvests and Halloween hauntings, luring day-trippers and weekenders to rural areas. But if summer is any guide, many fall festivities may require more planning this year to avoid the crowds.

While visitors may still launch a pumpkin from a catapult, pandemic restrictions will touch everything: Hay rides will now be socially distanced, and masked clowns will be poised to scare haunted house visitors from six feet away.

North Carolina Apple Festival celebrates the area’s fruit growers and has, in recent years, drawn some 250,000 attendees to

Fall’s Here. Can We Still Go Apple Picking?

Across much of the country, fall is the season of apple-picking, corn mazes, winery harvests and Halloween hauntings, luring day-trippers and weekenders to rural areas. But if summer is any guide, many fall festivities may require more planning this year to avoid the crowds.

While visitors may still launch a pumpkin from a catapult, pandemic restrictions will touch everything: Hay rides will now be socially distanced, and masked clowns will be poised to scare haunted house visitors from six feet away.

North Carolina Apple Festival celebrates the area’s fruit growers and has, in recent years, drawn some 250,000 attendees to

Top 5 Looks From the 2020 Emmys: Zendaya in Christopher John Rogers, Regina King in Schiaparelli, Billy Porter in Ashi Studio and More!

Last night, the 72nd Emmy Awards went down both virtually and in-person with social distancing and safety precautions in place. Hosted by Jimmy Kimmel, we witnessed stars like Regina King, Uzo Aduba, and Yahya Abdul-Mateen II take home awards for the evening. Zendaya even made history as she walked away with her first Emmy for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series for the show Euphoria, making her the youngest person and Second Black person to earn an Emmy for Lead Actress in a Drama Series! Aside from the award recognitions, the stars were dressed the impress despite pandemic …

Surviving Fashion’s Summer From Hell

In late April, Amy Smilovic began streaming live from the Instagram account of her fashion label, Tibi. About once a week, she and Dione Davis, her styling director, would put on Tibi outfits and talk — easily, authoritatively — about how the clothes made them feel.

“When you feel good about the outfit that you’ve put on, your confidence just can go through the roof,” Ms. Smilovic said in one early episode, after Ms. Davis modeled a pair of tailored bloomers. In the same session she wryly compared her pandemic state to a “walking pharmaceutical commercial” whose list of symptoms

On Racism and British Fashion

“I’ve always considered myself an outsider,” Osman Yousefzada said last week, sitting on a park bench near his home in North London. “Often, I’ve also been made to feel like an outsider, working in and around institutions and industries like fashion that are rooted in white codes and elitism.”

At 43, he is an established fashion designer (his sculptural silhouettes have been worn by Lady Gaga, Beyoncé and Taylor Swift); an artist (see 2018’s “Being Somewhere Else,” an exhibition on the subjects of race and migration at the Ikon Gallery); a filmmaker (for June’s digital London Fashion Week he showed

Inside the Social World of Shift-Scheduling Apps

Zoom fatigue, layoffs in Slack chat, reply-all meltdowns and the general destruction of work-life boundaries: The digitized plight of the white-collar office employee, 9-to-5-ing remotely, has been documented extensively.

In non-white-collar industries, hit even harder by the pandemic — small businesses like restaurants, bars and independent retailers — managers have spent much of this year dealing with more immediate and brutal dilemmas, making major staff cuts and furloughs, navigating complicated loan applications and weighing closures both temporary and permanent. Their employees, many unable to collect unemployment benefits that are now running out anyway, are not only eager for work but also

Collina Strada 2020: Finally, Someone Made a Fashion Week Video That Feels Like a Ketamine Trip on a Farm!

We’re decidedly not digital Fashion Week haters over at GQ, but many of the video presentations have been a little…tasteful. You know: the camera caressing a beige knit while a totally intense part of a Bach partita plays… Some guy talking about pinch pots and craftsmanship… It’s all very beautiful, but it gets a little stale.

So imagine my excitement when Collina Strada, creators of downtown environmentalist-club-kid clothes, headed by Hillary Taymour, released a video for New York Fashion Week designed to disturb. Finally! A brand made a fashion video that feels like a ketamine trip on a …

The Hosts of ‘Back Issue’ Want to Throw It Back

Remember when watching the sitcoms “Martin” and “Living Single” or the variety show “In Living Color” meant that it was the end of the day and it was time to have a laugh? Or when Tyra Banks gave her now iconic “We were rooting for you!” rant on “America’s Next Top Model?”

On “Back Issue,” a podcast produced by Pineapple Street Studios, Tracy Clayton, 38, and Josh Gwynn, 32, rewind to some of the pop culture moments they have always wanted to know more about, with an authority on the episode at their side.

During the first episode, which premiered